13 Things Doctors Refuse to Have in Their Homes from 13 Things Doctors Refuse to Have in Their Homes

13 Things Doctors Refuse to Have in Their Homes

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13 Things Doctors Refuse to Have in Their Homes

Doctors see all kinds of gruesome things which made us wonder - what are some of the objects that they would never keep in their homes? Mainly focusing on health , nutrition, and safety related things, some of the items on this list may come as a surprise.

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Red Meat

Take caution. Believe it or not, red meat may do your body more harm than good. “Red meat can cause an inflammatory cascade that its consumption triggers,” Dr. Lisa Davis, Chief Nutrition Officer at Terra’s Kitchen, says.

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Non-Stick Cookware

“The man-made chemical used to create the nearly frictionless surface of non-stick cookware, known as perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), is believed to increase the risk of several forms of cancer, including testicular, kidney, thyroid, prostate, bladder, and ovarian,” Dr. Sarah Williams, professional consultant for the Between Us Clinic, says. “PFOA has the potential to remain in the environment, as well as the human body, for a very long period of time, and individuals can be exposed through drinking water that has been contaminated with PFOA, certain foods, household dust, ski wax, and stain-resistant fabric or carpeting.”

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White Bread

“White bread is processed, nutrient-poor and spikes your blood sugar level,” Davis says. “Moreover, people are often intolerant to the gluten in bread, making it hard to digest.”

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Frozen, Pre-Packaged Meals

Pre-packaged meals are often heavily processed with chemicals,” Davis says. “No need for [them] when there are so many great meal delivery services available that provide fresh, ready-prepped meals, like Terra’s Kitchen.”

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Old or Expired Prescriptions – Particularly Pain Pills

“According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), unintentional drug poisonings accounted for nearly 470 deaths per 1,000 individuals in the U.S. in 2015 alone,” Williams says. “Medications that are no longer being used should be disposed of properly in order to prevent a potential threat to the safety or health of yourself or your loved one.”

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Fruits and Vegetables on the Dirty Dozen List

“The following fruits tested highest for concentrations of pesticides compared to others according to Environmental Working Group’s (EWG’s) Dirty Dozen™ for 2016: Strawberries, apples, nectarines, peaches, celery, grapes, cherries, spinach, tomatoes, sweet bell peppers, cherry tomatoes, and cucumbers topped the list of worst offenders,” Davis says. “Ninety-eight percent of strawberries, peaches, nectarines, and apples tested positive for at least one pesticide residue! If your favorite fruit or vegetable is on the Dirty Dozen™ list, then buy organic.”

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Soda

Regular soda is like liquid candy – filled with sugar and calories and provides no nutritional value,” Davis says. Sugar is bad for more than just your teeth – it is bad for every cell in your body because it is an inflammatory substance, she adds. “Drink more water!”

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Mothballs

“Naphthalene, the chemical found in mothballs, is created from crude oil or coal tar and can also be found in cigarette smoke, smoke from forest fires, and vehicle exhaust. When inhaled, naphthalene gas leads to hemolytic anemia and also causes liver and kidney damage,” Williams says. “Young children are considered to be particularly at risk for naphthalene poisoning, because mothballs so closely resemble candy.”

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Window Blinds

“According to data from the CPSC, between 1996 and 2012 nearly 1,600 children received treatment for injuries, such as brain damage from suffocation, caused by entanglement in the cords on window blinds,” Williams says. “These cords also pose a significant risk for strangulation and many doctors are now recommending alternative types of window coverings in order to reduce the possibility of injury.”

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Plastic Bottles Containing BPA

“Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical found in polycarbonate plastics, as well as epoxy resin. There has been some evidence that BPA can seep into food or beverages stored in these types of plastic containers,” Williams says. “Exposure to BPA is linked with a number of detrimental outcomes, including structural damage within the brain, stimulation of prostate cancer cells, and even increase [in] blood pressure.”

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Space Heaters

“Though it is common for homes to use portable electric space heaters to provide additional heat during the coldest months, these devices are associated with significant safety risks,” Williams says. “According to the CPSC, who grouped portable space heaters with heating stoves in their analysis, the average annual rate of injury is nearly 25,000, with more than 2,600 fatalities associated with the appliances.”

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Pool or Hot Tub

“According to data from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission the incidence rate of pool and hot tub related injuries averages more than 150,000 annually, with around 540 deaths per year that are caused by pools and hot tubs,” Williams says.

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Bunk Beds

“Beds can be considered a dangerous item in general because many contain toxic, fire-retardant chemicals,” Williams says. “Bunk beds, however, are considered to be particularly hazardous, leading to more 39,000 injuries each year.” According to the CPSC, bunk bed accidents are known to contribute to around 270 deaths annually in the U.S., she adds.

13 Things Doctors Refuse to Have in Their Homes