Tips to Help You Ski a New Resort like a Local from 7 Tips to Help You Ski a New Resort like a Local

7 Tips to Help You Ski a New Resort like a Local

Tips to Help You Ski a New Resort like a Local

Shutterstock

There are a few things skiers can do to offset the learning curve of a new mountain. We’ve highlighted a few tips to help you break with your visitor vibe and begin mixing with the local crowd. Just remember, even though it sounds cheesy, a smile and friendly attitude will go a very long way in helping you fit in and enjoy your time on the slopes.

Photo credit: Shutterstock.com

Map It Out

Shutterstock

The first step to learning new terrain is pretty simple, study the map. While a map certainly won’t outline all the nuances, it will give you an idea of where to start, what lifts you’ll be riding most and the areas you might want to avoid. Getting familiar with the names of lifts and major trails will help too, especially when you start chatting up the locals about their favorite spots.

Photo credit: Shutterstock.com

Ski During the Week

Shutterstock

When you can manage to ski your home mountain during the week it is simply blissful. The powder hasn’t been pounded to bits and it can feel like you own the mountain, what’s better? Well, skiing a new mountain under the same uncrowded conditions can be just as rewarding. It’s far easier to learn a new ski area when you’re not waiting forever in lift lines or worried about tons of other skiers and boarders swarming the same slope.

Photo credit: Shutterstock.com

Hire an Instructor

Shutterstock

You may be one heck of a skier but we can all learn a little something more—especially when we’re at a new mountain. Who better to show you the ropes than a professional instructor that knows the mountain better than almost anyone else? Book a private lesson and get the inside scoop first-hand, it’s well worth the money.

Photo credit: Shutterstock.com

Befriend a Local

Shutterstock

The info may or may not be as good as professional advice, but chatting up the locals is definitely worthwhile. Some mountain experts won’t want to give away their top spots but others might point you in the right direction of some hidden powder or the great dive bar down the street. It never hurts to ask, just remember to return the favor when others visit your home turf.

Photo credit: Shutterstock.com

Bring Friends from Home

Shutterstock

Your ski buddies bring excitement and fun to your local mountain trips and they can help even more when you travel to new spots. Two or three skiers is better than one when checking out tons of new terrain—you and your friends can cover more terrain, share tips and then decide on the best trails. It’s also nice to have your crew along for après celebrations.

Photo credit: Shutterstock.com

Consult the Web

Shutterstock

A little bit of research goes a long way before exploring a new resort. Websites, forums and GoPro videos offer a look at must-ski runs from people who have been there and crushed it. While learning the virtual ins-and-outs, be aware of your personal limitations. Finally, check the mountains website for info on conditions and closed runs before you head out.

Photo credit: Shutterstock.com

Make a Plan

Shutterstock

Put all that knowledge to use and formulate a plan before you hit the slopes. If you decide to hire a ski instructor call ahead, if you’d rather figure it out yourself at least plan the first few runs. The last thing you’ll want is to waste valuable time deciding what to do at the base of the mountain.

Photo credit: Shutterstock.com