Grand Teton National Park

Overview

Grand Teton National Park protects stunning mountain scenery and a diverse array of wildlife. The central feature of the park is the Teton Range, an active, fault-block, 40-mile long mountain front. The range includes eight peaks over 12,000-feet, including the Grand Teton at 13,770-feet. Seven morainal lakes run along the base of the range, and more than 100 alpine lakes can be found in the backcountry. Elk, moose, pronghorn, mule deer, and bison are commonly seen in the park. Black bears are common in forested areas, while grizzlies are occasionally observed in the northern part of the park. More than 300 species of birds can be observed, including bald eagles and peregrine falcons. Located in northwestern Wyoming, Grand Teton National Park preserves a spectacular landscape rich with majestic mountains, pristine lakes and extraordinary wildlife. The abrupt vertical rise of the jagged Teton Range contrasts with the horizontal sage-covered valley and glacial lakes at their base, creating world-renowned scenery that attracts nearly four million visitors per year.

Map

Seasonality / Weather

Jackson Hole has long, cold winters. The first heavy snows fall by November 1 and continue through March; snow and frost are possible during any month. Mid-April, May and June have mild days and cool nights alternate with rain and occasional snow. Valley trails are snow covered until late May. July and August have warm days and cool nights prevail, with afternoon thundershowers common. September - November has sunny days and cold nights alternate with rain and occasional snow storms. December - mid-April has days that are sunny and nights that are frigid. Snow blankets the mountains and valley. Vehicles with four-wheel drive or all-weather tires are recommended for winter travel, roads may be closed during blizzards. Drive at or below posted speed limits at all times; moose and other wildlife are often seen crossing roads during the winter.

Directions

Driving: 

From Salt Lake City, Utah there are three options: (approximately 275 miles/5-6 hours)

1) I-15 to Idaho Falls. 2) Highway 26 to Swan Valley. 3) Highway 31 over Pine Creek Pass to Victor. 4) Highway 22 over Teton Pass, through Wilson to Jackson. You will see a sign in Swan Valley directing you to Jackson via Highway 26 to Alpine Junction, ignore the sign and follow the signs to Victor/Driggs, Idaho

If you would like to avoid the 10% grade of Teton Pass: 1) Highway 26 from Idaho Falls to Swan Valley. 2) Continue on Highway 26 to Alpine Junction. 3) Highway 26/89 to Hoback Junction. Highway 26/89/191 to Jackson.

OR 1) I-80 to Evanston. 2) Highway 89/16 to Woodruff, Randolph, and Sage Creek Junction. 3) Highway 30/89 to Cokeville and then Border. 4) Continue on Highway 89 to Afton, and then to Alpine Junction. 5) Highway 26/89 to Hoback Junction. 6) Highway 26/89/191 to Jackson

From Denver, Colorado there are two options: (approximately 550 miles/9-10 hours)

1) I-25N to Cheyenne. 2) I-80W through Laramie to Rock Springs. 3) Highway 191 North through Pinedale. 4) Highway 191/189 to Hoback Junction. 5) Highway 191 to Jackson.

1) I-25N to Fort Collins. 2) Highway 287 North to Laramie. 3) I-80W to Rawlins. 4) Highway 287 to Muddy Gap Junction. 5) Continue on Highway 287 to Jeffrey City, Lander, Fort Washakie, Crowheart, and Dubois. 6) Highway 287/26 over Togwotee Pass to Moran. 7) Highway 26/89/191 to Jackson.

Flying: 

The closest airports to the park are: Jackson Hole Airport, Jackson, Wyoming (JAC), Idaho Falls Regional Airport, Idaho Falls, Idaho (IDA) and Salt Lake City International Airport, Salt Lake City, Utah (SLC).

Public Transport: 

Shuttle services to and from Jackson are available from Salt Lake City, Utah; Pocatello, Idaho; and Idaho Falls, Idaho.