The Best Books for Yogis

Take your yoga practice further with these excellent reads


Dewi—After purchasing yoga classics such as “The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali” and “The Bhagavad Gita,” I found myself wanting more. With little idea of where or how to start building a yoga library, I reached out to the brightest, wisest and downright coolest yogis I know to find out what books they hold dear.

If you're the kind of person who can't get enough of your teacher's wise parting words during Savasana; loves setting an intention for each practice and captions your yoga pictures with motivational quotes, this list is for you.

Three Incredible Yogi Reads

Meditations from the Mat: Daily Reflections on the Path of Yoga
By Rolf Gates & Katrina Kenison

Are you interested in the philosophy behind yoga and how it applies to your life, but not the heavy reading that sometimes comes along with it? You'll love this book. Broken down into 365 short essays that build upon each other, it is written in contemporary language with no shortage of humor, honesty, humility and wisdom. Described by one reader as “a one-a-day vitamin for the yogic soul,” this is a great choice for anyone seeking down-to-earth inspiration in daily life.

The Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice
By T.K.V Desikachar

As the son of T. Krishnamacharya, often referred to as the “father of modern yoga," Desikachar was uniquely qualified to write this book. Based on his personal experiences and "The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali," the emphasis here is on gradually learning and enjoying each pose instead of hurrying to complete your practice. It focuses on both physical and spiritual elements while helping you tailor each aspect to your specific preferences and lifestyle–pitch-perfect for beginners and advanced yogis alike.

The Inner Tradition of Yoga: A Guide to Yoga Philosophy for the Contemporary Practitioner
By Michael Stone

Written for a Western audience, this is a highly-accessible exploration of how yoga theory applies to our practice on the mat. Practical and poetic, it's a deep read that's best accompanied by a cup of tea and followed up with some meditation time. Touching on the ethics of non-violence, patience, honesty and respect, Michael explores the mind-body connection and weaves in some Buddhist philosophy to boot.



No votes yet

Let's Be Friends. Follow The Active Times on Facebook!