Aniakchak National Monument & Preserve

Overview

The Aniakchak Caldera, is the result of a series of eruptions, the last in 1931. Given its remote location and notoriously bad weather, Aniakchak is one of the least visited units of the National Park System. A vibrant reminder of Alaska's location in the volcanically active "Ring of Fire," the monument is home to an impressive six-mile wide, 2,500 ft. deep caldera formed during a massive eruption 3,500 years ago.

Map

Seasonality / Weather

Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve is a truly primitive landscape with no federally-maintained public facilities. The National Park Service imposes no operating hours or seasonal restrictions. Access to and movement within Aniakchak, however, may be limited or restricted at any time depending upon prevailing weather conditions and/or volcanic activity.

Directions

Driving: 

Located on the Alaska Peninsula, 450 miles southwest of Anchorage, Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve is inaccessible by road. Notoriously bad weather makes access to Aniakchak unpredictable. Drop-offs and/or pick-ups may be significantly delayed.

Flying: 

Aniakchak National Monument may be directly accessed via air taxi flights chartered from King Salmon, AK and other nearby small towns and villages. Air charters can land you at Meshik Lake, Surprise Lake in the caldera, or Aniakchak, Amber, or Kujulik bays on the Pacific Ocean. Regularly scheduled commercial flights to King Salmon (AKN), the location of National Park Service administrative headquarters and the starting point for many Aniakchak adventures, are available from Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (ANC) via PenAir and Alaska Airlines.

Public Transport: 

Power boats can reach the Preserve portions of Aniakchak from villages along the Pacific Ocean coastline.